Redneck Bride And Groom

Redneck Bride And Groom

Redneck Bride And Groom

The women didn’t mind that their dashing men looked less than dapper in their period clothing; they actually preferred it that way because it highlighted the men’s “redneckedness” rather than subduing it.

Their disdain for Kelly and Kevin’s union had little to do with class consciousness; all six women were college graduates who worked as managers or executives in high-end businesses such as pedicures, interior design firms and law firms.

Though she was a college dropout, the other redneck bride was an avid reader who owned several antique bookshops in her home state of North Carolina.

She also gave regular book talks about how she had acquired her vast collection through selling books she did not like or want anymore to antique stores or online sellers such as Amazon or eBay.

WHILE THE WOMEN MAY HAVE BEEN EMBARRASSED BY THEIR HUSBANDS’ MILITARY UNIFORMS, THEY CERTAINLY WEREN’T ANGRY AT THEM FOR GOING AGAINST WHAT THEY BELIEVED WAS RIGHT FOR THEM AT THIS STAGE IN LIFE.

None of the women envied Kelly or Kevin for having found someone who would put up with all of her quirks@ such as her nail biting@ and tolerate her constant nagging toward domesticity and marriage stability for herself and their three children under 10 years old.

Like all other rednecks, Kelly believed that financial security came from being married and having children@ not from college degrees or high salaries alone@ and she would not compromise on this issue when searching for a mate either online or offline to find one willing to go along with her views on life and marriage so far outside mainstream American culture norms that she appeared downright crazy to most observers both inside and outside her state by comparison@ but she found just what she was looking forward here at Fort Stewart!

The redneck women wanted their husbands to look dapper for their Gone with the Wind-themed nuptials.

The men obliged by choosing Confederate dress uniforms over jeans for their outdoor ceremony and reception at Fort Stewart near Augusta, Georgia.

Their white suits featured large red plaid patterns over Union blue.

They also donned gray or brown shirts with brass buttons and cummerbunds or none at all.

Both plaid and gray clashed with Kelly’s blond hair, blue eyes and fair skin tones.

Their mismatched looks made it seem like they had stepped out of a Laundromat, not a Civil War uniform factory.

What do you get when you take two modern American redneck couples and give them a 1950s Southern Gothic novel to base their wedding activities on? You get a hilarious comedy of manners with a few serious undertones.

The “Gone with the Wind”-inspired wedding of Kevin and Kelly in Georgia’s Appalachian valley is the subject of Jessica Millar’s book.

The redneck couples based their choices on characters from Margaret Mitchell’s novel.

They had a Gone with the Wind-inspired wedding complete with petticoats, corsets and Confederate flags.

They even named their daughter Scarlett.

The story of this ill-fated pairing is as follows.

While some readers might find fault in both sets of characters based on how rednecks are perceived in general, this particular set plays off that perception quite humorously despite its less than ideal situations both before and during their wedding festivities at Fort Stewart near Augusta, Georgia (where many former soldiers now work).

It is clear from reading Millar’s book that neither Kevin nor Kelly wanted anything but an enjoyable experience for themselves on their wedding day even if it meant doing things contrary to societal mores by doing so much outside what most people would consider “normalcy.” The fact that both Kevin (the husband) AND Kelly (the wife) were willing to go along with what society thinks are \ un-normal\ behaviors doesn't help show society's intolerance toward these non-mainstream values!


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